Class D experiments…

There are many class D technologies on the market at the moment, but one of the ones I haven’t tried (until now at least) is the International Rectifier “IRAUD7”-amps (IRF has been acquired by Infinion).

Consisting of the IRS2092 driver IC and various purpose-built FETs (many of them two FETs in a single package suitable for half-bridge designs), this is by most accounts a good-sounding and scalable class D technology. It’s also one of the few technologies where you can actually have a go at your own PCB layout if you want to. The schematics are available in IRFs published reference designs (here and here) and although making good PCB layouts for high-power switching electronics isn’t easy, it is actually possible to do.

Of course, when something is so easily available it tends to get exploited. It wasn’t long after IR introduced the designs before the market was flooded with several cheap clones, some using their own PCB layouts and some using IRs own Gerber files which are also published on the website. I had my eyes on some small (credit-card sized) boards to try for a while as they were really cheap (do an ebay-search for “IRS2092” and you’ll see 🙂 ), but eventually spotted this “luxury” version (at least based on appearance and observed parts quality) and fell in.

This build is the “low power” version with the IRFI4019 FET, but there’s also higher-power version with the IRFI4020 FET. Since the seller I bought from made a mix-up in ordering I actually ended up having a pair of each version, but I wanted to start with the low-power version. Then I might go dual-mono on the high-power boards later on if the sound quality proves it worthwhile 😀

The PSU consists of a 200VA transformer and a cheap supply PCB with 45mF capacitance per rail – mostly because that was what I had in my parts drawers. I’ve tried to keep the mechanics as simple as possible since I consider this build an experiment, but having the amp and PSU on a mounting plate simply makes everything much easier so I decided to “splurge” a little anyway :). The front panel is blank until I decide how the amp is going to be used.

Even though the pictures show the amplifiers uncabled (which they still are), I did manage some sneak listening on the modules and I am looking forward getting these into my main system for a proper test 🙂

 

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2 Responses to Class D experiments…

  1. Walker says:

    These look great. I didn’t realize Infineon had acquired IRF–seems like it’s been a few years. Shows what I know. Has that had any effect on parts you plan to use?

    • theslowdiyer says:

      I didn’t know about the acquisition either but it probably doesn’t matter – consolidation has been a recurring theme in the semiconductor business for a long while now.

      What does matter is that fewer companies tend to mean less choice, especially among the (mainly niche-type) parts that are used by diy’ers. Unfortunately not much we can do to stop that trend I guess 😦

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