Zero Audio?

Around a year ago I first tried making a music streamer from my original Raspberry Pi, a digital converter board from Audiophonics and Volumio. Apart from my unfamiliarity with Linux causing some confusion, it actually worked well and it caused me to have a bit of a mindset change. Originally I wanted to have my music stored locally on a harddrive on the playing device (a MacMini with Amarra), but since the NAS I use for redundant backup of files is just sitting there anyway, streaming was suddenly a viable option. Since then I have been happily using a RPi 3 and cheap digital converter board from ebay as a streamer to feed my Arcam DAC, switching between Volumio and Runeaudio for the software-part.

I am mostly happy with this setup, but since the RPi Zero came out a while ago I’d wanted to try using that for something similar and take advantage of the compact size. To match the Zero I bought a “TinyToslink” adapter to give the Zero an optical output to feed my DAC. It seems to work well, but it’s a bit surprising – in a good way – that something less than half the size of a credit card (excluding all the necessary adapters of course 😀 ) produces sound like this.

I have some ideas for how to case this to make it pretty, but it’s going to take a while as it’s not a priority right now. Also, the TinyTOSlink is not as sophisticated as e.g. the Hifiberry Digi+ Pro (which I have my eye on as well), and there are a few things that could be better. One of the problems is that it doesn’t do 192 kHz over optical (and my DAC will not accept that either), so I have been wondering about DIY’ing a version with transformer-isolated coax out instead – maybe later ;).

I’ll probably continue experimenting a little with the Zero and leave the RPi3 in my main system, but if you want to get a cheap streamer together the Pi – regardless of format – is a good option. And it can of course also do many other things as well (especially if you can be bothered to learn some basic Linux, which I can’t right now 😀 )

Project files: IRM Switching PSUs

What is it?
Since I first discovered the IRM-series of compact switching supplies from Mean Well I’ve grown quite fond of them. They are compact, cheap and very easy to implement so they are perfect for everywhere an “aux-voltage” is required to power non-critical circuitry. Through the different applications I’ve found for these I have managed to build up a full series of boards suitable for the IRMs.

While some of the boards can be (and are intended to be) used for “serious” stuff (to be shown later on), a very obvious application for most of these boards are as AUX-supplies for powering relays, displays, logic circuitry etc. where a bit more or a bit less ripple and noise are of no consequence, but where the compact size and low standby consumption is a real plus.

There are four board versions, suitable for the IRM modules in all versions from 3-30W output power (the 30W board is missing from the pictures as I couldn’t find the prototype when they were taken – sorry! 😀 ).

How big are the boards?

  • The 3W board measures 1.8” x 1.5” (app. 46 x 38 mm.)
  • The 5/10W board measures 1.2” x 2.65” (app. 31 x 67 mm.)
  • The 15/20W board measures 1.25” x 2.95” (app. 32 x 75 mm.)
  • The 30W board measures 1.6” x 3.6” (app. 41 x 92 mm.)

What is the status of the boards?
All of the board files are version 1.0 or higher. Some tweaks have been done after the initial protoypes for a few of them, mostly because of errors/issues with the IRM module footprints.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
No, none. Several places to get the IRM-modules them selves (Mouser, Reichelt, TME etc.) and everything else on the boards is more or less optional 😀

Anything else I need to know?

  • The modules have worse specs for ripple and noise than most linear regulators, but obviously the switching frequency is quite high (66-100 kHz depending on model), which means that passive filtering like an LC or a CRC (“pi”) filter would be an ideal way of reducing the output noise. I have a couple of examples for that which I might show later.
  • I haven’t been able to find a spec for how much capacitance the modules will tolerate on the output, but it probably should not be overdone.
  • Remember that obviously one side of the board carries mains voltage, so take the necessary precautions when working with them.

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.