Project files: Little helpers – Capacitor boards

Another post in my “little helpers” project series consists of a couple of capacitor boards for mounting input/output capacitors that will not otherwise fit on an amplifier board.

What is it?
Universal boards for (input) capacitor mouting, either for testing purposes or for designs where there is no space to mount a decent-sized capacitor on the main PCB. I made the small board to supplement my P3A clone where adding a large input capacitor would have increased the overall board size quite a bit, so using an off board input cap gives more flexibility. The background for the ridiculously large “MegaMKP”-version you can read in my previous post.

How big are the boards?
This big 🙂

  • The “normal” board measures 2.0″ x 2.0″ (app. 51 x 51 mm.)
  • The “MegaMKP” board measures 3.95″ x 0.625″ (app. 100 x 16 mm.)

What is the status of the boards?
Both boards are in v1.0, meaning they have been tested and are working.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Well, there’s really nothing on these boards except the capacitors 😀

Anything else I need to know?

  • The small board has capacitor mounting for small caps on the top and for larger caps. Max dimensions are approximately:
    • Bottom side mounting: 25 x 38mm axial capacitor (with holes for 33mm long caps as well).
    • Top side mounting: 27mm lead spacing x 15mm thick box cap or app. 20 x 28 mm. axial capacitor.
  • If using the bottom side mounting points, either mount the board upside down on standoffs or don’t use the footprint for the terminal block but solder wires to the board instead.
  • The large board has holes for a various combinations of 2/3/4 large caps. There are screw holes that can be used to mount the boards to the chassis via standoffs so you can use caps as big as you like.

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

Project files: Little helpers – Fuseboards

The third part of my “little helpers” project series consists of a few connector/fuse boards for power supplies or for testing/lab use. Not exactly the world’s most interesting PCBs, but still  – they can be quite useful so I decided to publish them anyway 🙂

What is it?
These are simple fuse-boards with LEDs to be used on the secondary side of a transformer or DC PSUs (such as switchers). There are two versions:

One version can be used to combine two AC or DC voltages to provide a center-tapped voltage. The circuit works on both AC and DC so can be used for example for wiring up two secondary windings on a transformer to provide a +/- voltage or for combining two DC power supplies to do the same.

The second type of board is more or less identical, except that the ground plane is split so they are “passthrough” for the input voltages. This is useful for instance if you want to put fuses between the transformer secondary and a PSU board that already has an onboard rectifier and does not need (or want) a center-tapped voltage.

The boards also include fuses for both rails as well as LEDs to indicate that power is applied. If connected in the “standard” way then the LEDs are connected to the input through the fuse, so if the fuse breaks the corresponding LED will turn off.

How big are the boards?
There are two sizes of both designs:

  • The “small” one measures 2.0″x1.95″ (app. 51x50mm)
  • The “normal” one measures 2.5″x1.95″ (app. 64x50mm)

The two versions are compatible, meaning the board size and hole spacing are the same for the two versions.

What is the status of the boards?
All boards are in v1.0, meaning they have been tested and are working. (Well, to be honest I haven’t received the prototype versions of the “passthrough” boards yet, but as they are made from the schematics to the other ones I expect no issues) 🙂

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Not really. The fuses are standard 5x20mm types with holders (22.5mm lead spacing). The LEDs, resistors and diodes are all “standard” types and the terminal blocks are 5.0/5.08mm types.

Anything else I need to know?

  • On the large boards it should be possible to use PCB-mounted FAST-ON tabs instead of the terminal blocks (not tested though).
  • Note: These boards are not intended for mains voltage use!

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

Project files: Little helpers – Connectors

The second part of my “little helpers” project series consists of a few connector boards amplifiers or for testing/lab use.

What is it?
Three boards for various connectors and purposes:

  • An XLR/TRS-board which is a small breakout-board for a Neutrik NC6FI-H XLR/TRS combo connector that means you can then use bare wires or a three-pin connector to wire up the socket.
  • An XLR I/O board which is intended for XLR in and loop out with “standard” PCB-mounted Neutrik D-series XLR connectors.
  • An RCA I/O board which is designed for some board mounted RCA connectors. I don’t actually know who makes these but they are pretty much the only decent-quality style PCB mounted RCAs that I know of. There are a couple of of internet sources for them (ebay, audiophonics, Rapid electronics, ) and I think they are identical (if nothing else then in size/dimensions) to the ones sold by Vampire at a more “audiophile” price 😉 If anyone knows the “true” source of these then I’d like to know?

How big are the boards?
Small… I don’t want to list them all here 🙂

What is the status of the boards?
The boards are in v1.0 which means they have been tested and are working.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Mostly there’s only one real part on the board and that is the connector itself which can be a bit expensive, so yes, I guess so 😀

Anything else I need to know?

  • Note that although the XLR/TRS sockets do fit into a standard Neutrik D-series hole, for reasons I don’t quite understand the board will not sit completely straight if mounted that way. For most uses that will not be a problem, but if you want to use these in a 1U enclosure you need to be a bit careful or mount the board upside down. To avoid this, make your panel holes exactly as it is shown on the drawing.
  • On the XLR-boards there is an onboard jumper to connect pin 1 to ground, so depending on usage (SE or BAL) and grounding scheme of your build, this is an easy way to manage ground loops. There is also a jumper to connect the chassis to ground which should not ever be necessary if everything you connect is made properly. If it isn’t, then that jumper is here to save the day 😀
  • The “XLR loop” boards are included in a “right” and a “left” version which are mirrored. If you only need one version and don’t really care which one, I’d recommend the one marked “left” as it has the nicest routing (unbroken ground plane).

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

As usual, please remember to consult the manufacturer’s datasheets as well and ensure that you verify the connector part numbers before hitting the “buy” button on anything :).