Project files: PA100 parallel gainclone

What is it?
Board files for my “PA100” parallel chip amp with the LM3886 first presented here.

I’ve used the app. note version of the circuit which is non-inverting and uses low-tolerance components to minimise offset between the two ICs. There is also the Jeff Rowland-derived inverting circuit that is normally employed as a PA150/BPA300 configuration with three ICs per board.

I’ve mosty stuck to the datasheet circuit, but in some areas I have drawn inspiration from Tom Christensens article on the LM3886 IC. I’ve used SMT-components where I believe it makes sense to get a tight layout, but mostly its nice and diy-friendly leaded parts 🙂

How big are the boards?
The board measures 3.9” x 2.4” (app. 99 x 61 mm).

What is the status of the boards?
The files are for board version 1.1. I’ve made the following changes compared to the v1.0 prototype.

  • Mute capacitor footprint enlarged.
  • Mute resistor moved to the center of the board to make space for the larger capacitor.
  • Footprint for the LM3886 changed as the holes were very too small.
  • Made a small space between the large reservoir capacitors so they don’t touch each other.

Note that I haven’t tested the v1.1 (yet – will include them with my next PCB order) but I don’t expect any adverse effects of these changes.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Not really, but the recommended resistors are lower tolerance than what is common (the 0805 resistors are 0.1% and the 0R1/3W output resistors are 1%). Mouser has them all and there should be plenty of other sources. The amp will work with standard tolerances (1% for the SMTs, 5% for the outputs) but if you’re unlucky with the tolerances then performance will suffer a bit (higher DC-offset on the output and higher idle dissipation in the ICs). The recommended parts are not much more expensive so I definitely recommend you stick to them.

Anything else I need to know?

  • The gain setting resistors (the SMD-ones) should be 0.1% tolerance for best performance (see above).
  • Similarly, the load-sharing resistors on the output should be 1% tolerance for best performance (see above).
  • The power LED on the board is only between the negative supply and ground, so it is not a 100% indication that everything is OK.
  • The board obviously works with both versions of the LM3886, but I recommend the isolated (TF) version because it’s easier to mount.
  • Decoupling: My decoupling scheme is somewhere between the datasheet recommendation and TomChrs decoupling scheme. The topside parts are intended to be 100nF MKT or X7R MLCCs which is more or less what the data sheet specifies, but on the bottom there are pads for 1206/1210 SMD caps which you can fill with 4u7-10uF X7R MLCCs. You can also use the SMD pads for 100nF MLCCs and then mount electrolytic on top, but there isn’t much space so be a bit careful.
  • The board should be fed from a DC power supply, linear or switching. The large reservoir caps can be as big as you like, but as my prototype boards are intended to be powered by an SMPS (which is sensitive to capacitive loading) I’ve used fairly small capacitors. If you use a linear supply by all means use bigger capacitors.
  • Bridging: You can bridge two boards to create a BPA200 amplifier, but remember a) to lower the supply voltage to around +/-28VDC and b) that you need either a fully-balanced source/preamp or you need to invert the phase using a balanced line driver such as a DRV134/THAT1646 or or fully-differential amplifier of some sort.
  • Mechanics: The C-to-C spacing between the ICs is 1.5” (38 mm).

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

You can find additional information about the LM3886 amplifiers in the data sheet, the AN-1192 appnote linked above and several other resources – check them all out 🙂

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Project files: Line Attenuators

What is it?
If you are using a preamp with gain you may have problems with only using a fraction of the available range on your volume control which is very annoying. The problem is usually caused by too much gain and/or an incorrect gain structure. If it is not possible to reduce the gain of one or more of the amplifiers in the chain, a solution can be to use inline attenuators from e.g. Rothwell Audio instead. These are quite expensive though, and they only come in predefined attenuation levels so for testing purposes a DIY-option such as I am presenting here might be better.

The attenuator is built on a small board with RCA sockets for input and output, as well as an option for fitting two parallel resistors on the output side. The gives two (or even three) selectable attenuation values. The selection can be either by jumpers or even via a switch to make the boards suitable for testing etc.

How big are the boards?
The board measures 1.75″ by 0.9″ (app. 44 x 23 mm) – plus of course the off-board part of the connectors.

What is the status of the boards?
The board is in v1.0, meaning it has been tested and confirmed working.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
The RCA sockets are clones of Vampire RCAs. They are normally the best board-mounted RCAs I know of and available on ebay. If you don’t want to use connectors or can’t find them, just connect the signal via a 0.1” header (or a JST XH/Molex KK connector) instead.

Anything else I need to know?

  • Important: The reason that Rothwells are built into the RCA-plug is to keep the signal path short and especially the load capacitance on the output side as low as possible. Use the shortest possible cables on the output of these to avoid the cables inducing an RF-rolloff.
  • The resistor values are quite important and should ideally be matched to the source and load impedance. I’ve used this thread (post #6) as a starting point but it’s worth reading up on the theory behind the operation as there are a few trade-offs involved.
  • The center-to-center spacing of the RCAs is 1.1″ (28mm)

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

Project files: LED tester

What is it?
The PCB files for my version of Håvard Skrodahls LED-tester as described here.

How big are the boards?
The board measures 2.0” x 1.6” (app. 51 x 41 mm.).

What is the status of the boards?
This is version 1.0 as everything (for once) worked the first time 🙂

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
None, really. The 16mm pots can be bought from ebay and everything else you should be able to get from multiple different sources. If possible, I would suggest using a stereo 5k-10k pot and the fully-isolated version of the LM317. The former gives the best adjustment range and the latter helps protect against mishaps with flying test leads 😀

Anything else I need to know?

  • For information about how the circuit works, read the hackaday-post linked above.
  • Output current can be calculated as 1.25V/Rtot. For max. current Rtot = R1 and for min. current the value is Rtot = R1 +  the pot value (with the decks in parallel if you are using a stereo pot obviously)
  • There is a difference between Lin/Log pot as described in the build article, so you’ll have to decide up front which adjustment profile fits you best (or keep the pot offboard so you can change – or just build two boards 🙂 ).
  • If you want to use the “high-current” mode, populate R2 as well and short the jumper. Remember that power dissipation in both the resistor and the LM317 regulator increases with higher current. The calculations for min and max current above have to be adjusted to reflect the fact that R1 and R2 are in parallel.
  • The connection for the ammeter is required as it is in series with the LED being tested. If you don’t want the ammeter, bridge If+ and If- connections as shown in the picture. The connection for the voltmeter is optional.  Note that I have tried using a cheap LED meter from ebay for the ammeter and I had some problems with it, whereas if i connect my normal multimeters everything works fine – YMMV.

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Be sure to read the original post for the exact circuit description, information and tips.

Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

Project files: The last of its kind…

…for a while at least 😀

What is it?
The last (and smallest) version of my EL2k buffered headphone amp using NOS Elantec 2008/2009 buffer ICs. This is the smallest version designed for 1.5″ heat sink profiles as described here. The two other versions are of course also still available (here and here):

How big are the boards?
The board measures 3.95″ x 1.5″ (app. 100 x 38 mm.) and is obviously a mono amplifier channel.

What is the status of the boards?
I’ve called this board version 1.5 as it is a redesign. Apart from the redesign work described in a previous post, the circuit is identical to the other published files.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Yes.

  • The EL2008/EL2009 buffers have been out of production for 10+ years. They can still be found and I don’t think you need to be especially concerned about fakes – there can’t be a lot of demand for these anymore – but of course no guarantees. The main risk is probably that instead of NOS parts that you get used parts that have been pulled from old equipment. This is annoying, but should be OK.
  • The heat sink profile is the same as the original, Fischer SK68, in 37mm length. Easy to get in Europe, but I’m not sure about elsewhere.

Anything else I need to know?

  • I’ve had to mount the buffers on the side of the heat sink that has an M2.5 slot and not an M3-slot. This isn’t a problem as such because there’s no need to isolate the tab, you’ll have to remember to buy M2.5 screws for mounting 😀
  • Otherwise this is a bog-standard buffered opamp circuit and there isn’t much that can go wrong 🙂

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Be sure to read the original posts for additional information and tips.

Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

Project files: VFET PSU

What is it?
In response to a reader request, the project files for my V-FET PSU board shown here. Of course, this will also work for any other class A design you might think of, as it is a fairly standard CC-R-C configuration with onboard rectifiers and space for three 35mm snap-in capacitors per rail. On typical class A voltages that means you’ll be able to use capacitors in the 22-33mF range and the the onboard rectifiers are 15-25A plastic SIP types, which should be just fine for most applications.

Input and output connections are via FAST-ON tabs and there are two sets of output connections. Since we’re paying for the copper on the boards anyway, I’ve tried to keep as much of it as possible  with a top-side ground plane and the supply rails on the bottom. 🙂

How big are the boards?
The board measures 3.1” x 6.675” (app. 78 x 170 mm).

What is the status of the boards?
Since the prototypes worked fine I haven’t made any changes and the board is therefore version 1.0.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Nothing worth worrying about really. The only possible exception is only really the rectifier which is in a small GBU-package. However, Mouser has them up to 25A (p/n 750-GBU2510-G) and they are available from many other sources in 10-15A variants as well.

Anything else I need to know?

  • If you want to use off-board bridges, bridge the AC and the DC-connections with as thick a wire as you can get through the holes. That should allow you to use offboard metal-cased rectifiers up to 50A. Since the average current draw of most class A amps is quite low and the surge ratings aren’t that different between package types I don’t see the need to use anything else than the plastic ones, but by all means complicate matters with offboard bridges if you must 😀
  • The four series resistors can be 3-5W types in parallel which should be plenty, even if you want to burn off a bit of voltage in them.
  • The (optional) 3W bleeder resistor discharges the two first capacitors while the LEDs will discharge the last ones. The series resistor for the LED can be a 1/2W or 1W type.
  • Last, but not least: Electrolytic capacitors in this sort of size aren’t to be trifled with, so make sure you mount them correctly and test the board properly before mounting it in your amplifier chassis.

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

vfetpsupcb-2

Project files: The (modified) EL2k headamp

What is it?
The board files for the new “medium-sized” version of the EL2k buffer/pre as shown a few weeks ago. The smaller 37mm board version will follow in a while.

How big are the boards?
The board measures 3.95″ x 2.0″ (app. 100 x 51 mm.) and is obviously a mono amplifier channel.

What is the status of the boards?
I’ve called this board version 1.5. Apart from the redesign work described in the last post, the circuit is identical to the originally published v1.1 files.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Yes.

  • The EL2008/EL2009 buffers have been out of production for 10+ years. They can still be found and I don’t think you need to be especially concerned about fakes – there can’t be a lot of demand for these anymore – but of course no guarantees. The main risk is probably that instead of NOS parts that you get used parts that have been pulled from old equipment. This is annoying, but should be OK.
  • The heat sink profile is the same as the original, Fischer SK68, in 50mm length. Easy to get in Europe, but I’m not sure about elsewhere.

Anything else I need to know?

  • I’ve had to mount the buffers on the side of the heat sink that has an M2.5 slot and not an M3-slot. This isn’t a problem as such because there’s no need to isolate the tab, but some swearing will likely ensue when you sit there on Sunday afternoon and realise you don’t have any M2.5 screws to hand 😀
  • Otherwise this is a bog-standard buffered opamp circuit and there isn’t much that can go wrong 🙂

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Be sure to read the original posts for additional information and tips. You should be able to reuse the linked BoM as well.

Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

Project files: ICEpower integrated amp board

What is it?
The project files for the “all-in-one” (nearly…) PCB for making integrated ICEpower amps shown in the previous post.

How big are the boards?
The board measures 2.65″ x 3.15″ (app. 67 x 80 mm.).

What is the status of the boards?
The board is version 2.1. As mentioned, it’s an old design that I have revised and updated to give it the 2.x version number. I’ve built my prototype on a v2.0 board and made some minor tweaks to that before publishing.
The changes in v2.1. are mostly mechanical (too little space for the input connectors etc.) and then minor touch-ups to the silk screen.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
No. The overall circuit is quite simple and only a few parts require a bit of attention.

  • The relays are standard mid-sized “2 form C” contact types. If you’re buying from scratch I’d recommend the Takamisawa RY-12W type, but there are app. 1 million equivalents with similar specs and footprint, so you may be able to get good surplus deals as well :). The coil voltage must be 12V.
  • The voltage regulators are standard 7812/7912 types but as they are mounted very close together I recommend the fully-insulated versions. I prefer the ones made by NJR as opposed to ST because the ST-ones seem to behave a bit strangely sometimes (and yes, I might be imagining this…).
  • See BoM-file for description of other parts and values.

Anything else I need to know?
A few things:

  • The on-board parts draw no current from the negative PSU rail. If you’re not using any external circuitry you can omit the negative rail (regulator etc.). If you build it anyway and get strange results, note that some regulators do not like a “no-load” condition and will give an weird unregulated output if not loaded. You can solder a 1-3k resistor on the bottom if you want for added peace of mind.
  • ASP/ASC-usage: It’s possible to use the board with ICEpower ASC and ASP modules. As these include a regulated +/- 12V AUX supply, you should jumper the regulators and the input resistors. The capacitors and remaining components can be left in.
  • Mute-header: The Mute-header simply brings the two pins required for the module’s mute or standby pins to work to a header at the from of the board to simplify wiring. Refer to the datasheet for the respective modules for details on how to use this, but in general you can switch using a mechanical switch.
  • Heat sinking: There is no heat sinking of the regulators as standard. With a simple preamp and no additional load this should not be necessary, but if you want to draw more power then use a small bit of metal as the heat sink. There is not much space in either direction, so using insulated regulators will once again be an advantage.
  • If you prefer a manual input switch, the board is just about ready and will be presented as part of another project post in a few weeks 🙂

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Please read the FAQs in the original post as well. The picture below shows my “in progress” prototype amp with the Minipre and a 50ASX-module and gives an idea of the expected layout.

Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

ice-int-wip

 

Project files: The Zen Headphone Amplifier

What is it?
The board files for my Zen Headphone Amplifier “remake” shown here.

How big are the boards?
The board measures 3.575” x 3.75” (app. 91 x 95 mm). This is obviously for a mono-channel.

What is the status of the boards?
The boards are version 1.0. The prototypes seem to work well and there wasn’t really anything that needed changing in my view.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Not really.

Anything else I need to know?
A few things:

  • Heatsinks: The basic type for me here in Europe is the Fischer SK129, but there are many manufacturers of this profile. The board is designed for the heatsinks to be soldered in place with pins, but screw-mounted versions might work as well. You can use 1″/25mm heat sinks, but in that case I recommend to tune the bias a little lower. My prototype measured app. 240 mA of bias and the heat sinks seemed to stabilise at around 55C in free air, which probably is a bit too much when the board is cased. So, either turn the bias down a bit and/or use taller heat sinks if your case allows for it.
  • Adjustments: Space around R10 and R12 is quite tight, especially with heat sinks/output caps taller than 25mm. In order to easily be able to adjust bias and balance of the amp, my suggestion would be that you don’t trim the leads of the two resistors completely flush but leave enough of the resistor legs that you can connect crocodile clips to them on the underside.
  • Output capacitors: The recommended value is 2 x 470uF from the original schematic, but if you’re using low-impedance headphones I think you should consider 2 x 1000uF instead. This is one place where I think “audiophile” capacitors can’t hurt, so look for Nichicon Muse (KZ/KW, FG/FW, ES etc.), Elna Cerafine/Silmic capacitors or similar. Bypassing the electrolytics with small film capacitors is easily done on the underside of the board if you want to.
  • Transistors: The Q3 footprint on the board is for a BC550C, but the original ZTX450 from the schematic can be used as well if it’s turned 180 degrees. Remember also to match at least the two Q2 FETs between channels as described in the build article. If you buy 8-10 of the IRF610 FETs you should be able to get a couple of very tight matches and the leftovers can be used for the current source (Q1).

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
See the original post for some more information and links to the build article for this design. After posting I actually also managed to find the original headwize article cached here – amazingly it seems that most of the headwize library has been kept intact there! 🙂

Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

zenhppcb-1

Project files: The Muffsy RIAA clone

What is it?
My version of the “Muffsy” RIAA board. As I observed in the first post my version really looks nothing like the original, so here’s a quick rundown of what I have changed:

  • The board is mono and intended to be stacked two channels on top of each other as shown in the pictures because that was what I needed. Side-by-side placement and/or dual-mono configurations are of course possible as well – if maybe a little less practical…
  • The board uses single opamps instead of the duals on the original. This of course increases the cost a bit, but it also offers more flexibility for those that want to experiment with how different opamps change the sound (because the choice of singles is much bigger – especially after this).
  • Because I’ve found myself using the mute button on my amplifier quite a lot when changing records, I got the idea to include a relay-based mute on the output of the RIAA so that mute is available even if your amplifier doesn’t have a mute option.
  • The input cap position has been kept because my usual cartridge expects a slightly higher load capacitance so I need a capacitor in that position (you can of course still leave it out if you want).
  • The output cap position is bigger to make space for a more “audiophile” sized capacitor 🙂
  • The selectable input impedance resistors have been removed. All of the cartridges I am reasonably going to use on my Pro-Ject turntable will be MM-types that need a 47k load impedance so I skipped this option – not that it’s a bad idea though.
  • The selectable gain I have kept, but instead of a DIP-switch I used a header/jumper which doesn’t take up as much space on the board. It’s only marginally less user-friendly than the DIP-switch in my opinion.
  • Otherwise the basic schematic and the component values remain the same as the original Muffsy.

How big are the boards?
The board measures 3.925” x 1.45” (app. 100 x 37 mm.).

What is the status of the boards?
The board file is v1.1 as I’ve fixed some minor niggles with the prototypes. I’ve tested the board and it works but I still don’t have detailed listening impressions, not least because – as the pictures show – I’m missing a couple of fairly important PSU components 😉

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Most of these components are standard sizes and it should be easy to find from the usual sources, however note the following:

  • Capacitors in the signal path should be polypropylene** film types and ideally 2% tolerance or less and in packages with 5mm pin spacing. If you can’t find 2% capacitors, buy a few 5% types of each value and match them using a multimeter to at least keep the variance between channels as low as possible (honestly this is worth checking regardless of what you buy).
  • Resistors should be 1% tolerance (or better – so if you want to “splurge” on 0.1% types go right ahead 😀 ). Obviously the resistors for the relay and the LED are exempted from this requirement 🙂
  • The muting relay is a tiny G6K type from Omron and as far as I know there are no substitutes from other manufacturers. Make sure you get the version with even 0.1” pin spacing.
  • I don’t really recommend buying expensive opamps from eBay or aliexpress because it is simply too easy to fake the markings on a standard DIP-package to make a surplus TL071 look like a NOS OPA627 at 10-20 times the price, but only you can decide if you think the risk is worth taking. There are some great offers on eBay, but sometimes you have to go through quite a bit of grief to find them…
  • **No, in actual fact no one is really going to die because you use polyester film caps but you’re an audiophile so you should aim for the best (within reason, if you happen to be both an audiophile and an engineer or just an audiophile that still has a bit of common sense left 😀 )

Anything else I need to know?

  • The muting relay is powered by the positive supply rail (via a resistor if the voltage is higher than 12V) with the switch in series, so any latching switch will be usable as the mute switch.
  • As standard, the muting relay switches both signal and ground. Not sure if this is always a good idea, but if not then it’s quite easy to bridge the GND-connection on the back of the board so only the signal is switched.
  • If you don’t want the mute option at all just bridge both of the positions marked on the back the board and you can skip the relay, the resistor, the diode across the relay and of course the connector and switch.
  • As is my custom for PCB layouts this is quite tight (ok, make that “cramped”), so a couple of tips: 1) remember the decoupling caps on top and 2) measure the voltage on the opamp sockets to ensure that everything is OK before mounting the opamps becasuse the decoupling electrolytics make it a bit difficult to remove the IC afterwards. If you want to experiment with different opamps, consider stacking two sockets on top of each other. This should lift the actual opamp above the electrolytics making it easier to remove.
  • Again: Note the two SMD decoupling caps on the top of the board. They need to be mounted before you solder the opamp sockets!!. They also mean that you have to use a socket and you can’t mount the opamp directly to the board.
  • I’ve used a basic LM317/LM337 power supply for mine (this one to be specific), but there might be something to gain by using more sophisticated low-noise types. It is also possible to power the circuit from a couple of 12V SLA batteries, but if it is worth the trouble I’m not sure (probably not though – if you want to put that much effort into a RIAA you should maybe consider starting from a more advanced circuit instead 😀 ).
  • Regarding the opamps, the “default” option is the LME49710, but there are lots of other DIP-options as well that could potentially be used (LT1363, LT1028, AD797, OPA627 etc. are all common choices for RIAA-circuits) as well as of course several others in SO-8 packages that can be used with suitable adapters. Unless you already have a favourite IC, my advice would be to start from the default (which should be among the best “value-for-money” options anyway) and then change once you’ve tried it so you can more easily identify changes.

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
As this is effectively a clone of the Muffsy board, you should read the Muffsy website for additional information (and if you really want the background, the original Audiokarma CNC thread as well).

Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

Oh, and remember I did this because I wanted to experiment and tailor an existing design to my own requirements and preferences. If you just want to build a board and get sound out of it, don’t bother with this but buy boards/kits of the original Muffsy instead 😀

Project files: Amplifier PSUs

Digging in the back catalogue a bit again here.…and found some of my power supply boards that I haven’t published yet 🙂

What is it?
Power supplies for amplifiers, d’oh! 😀 Two basic variants, namely a “class AB” type and a “class A” type. The “class A” type is intended to be used in a CxC configuration with resistors onboard for CRC and pads for a choke to make it CLC. The “class AB” one is a standard unregulated design for class AB or D amplifiers that allows using both small 16/18mm radial capacitors and large snap-in types (up to 35mm). Here there are two versions, one for 2 off 35mm caps (or 8 smaller caps) per rail and one for 3/12.

The picture below is of the large class AB board. It’s actually the board from the previous post that has had some caps mounted in the mean time 🙂

How big are the boards?
The AB board measures 3.55” x 3.9” (app. 90 x 99 mm.) for the standard version and 3.05” x 6.1” (app. 77 x 155 mm.) for the XL version. The CRC board measures 3.15” x 3.95” (app. 80 x 100 mm).

What is the status of the boards?
Both of the “class AB” boards are in v1.0. The “class A” board is in v1.1 as I made a couple of tweaks (including the pads for off board R/L) to my original version. The original v1.0 is the board that I use in my “Green Monstre” amps.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Nothing, really. You can go overboard with expensive capacitors if you want, but even if you have the money to put NOS Black Gates in your power supplies I’d still suggest you spend them elsewhere in the circuit 😀

Anything else I need to know?

  • Unless you are building very small amplifiers I’d recommend that the CRC and the small AB boards are used in dual-mono configurations with one PSU per amplifier channel. The large AB board can be shared across channels for a medium power class AB or D amplifier (meaning anything with a rail voltage up to around 55V and 63V caps).
  • The boards all include LEDs that indicate power and bleed the capacitors when no load is connected (albeit very slowly). The corresponding resistor footprints should be large enough to allow fairly high LED currents but remember to calculate the power dissipation.
  • The CRC board has space for two resistors in parallel per rail, either axial types (up to around 3-5W will fit) or MPC7x radial types up to 5W.
  • The rectifiers are GBU-types which are available from Mouser up to a 25A rating.
  • Input connections for the Class AB “XL” board are via FAST-ON tabs. All other input/output connections are via 5mm spacing screw terminals.
  • The capacitors on the class A-board can be up to 30mm in diameter. Since class A amps tend to get hot, I’d recommend 105 degree types here. As mentioned above, the class AB boards use either snap-in caps up to 35mm diameter or 16/18mm  radial caps with 7.5mm pin spacing.
  • Needless to say, all capacitors should be rated appropriately for your amplifier’s rail voltage.

     

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
These are very simple circuits, but there’s some god background on PSU design for amplifiers over on Rod Elliot’s pages (under “power”)

Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.