A tweeter amp…

Another overdue board design that finally showed up recently is this one. I would not call this design one of my “heroes” (like the last post), but it’s probably one of the “most-revised” since this version is actually the third iteration (although I honestly haven’t ordered or built the previous two iterations – not entirely sure why…).

So why is it called a tweeter amp? Well, two reasons: One is that the original intention was to supplement a single-supply class D amp in a bi-amp (plate-amp) setup, especially the power take-off on an ICEpower 200ASC/300AS1-module. The other reason is that if you want to improve the sound quality within the limits of the small board you’ll get a low-end roll off that means the amp is not going to play a lot of bass at all, but for a dedicated tweeter amp it is still perfectly usable.

The circuit is simple – it’s basically my version of the bog-standard single-supply circuit of the LM3886 IC (or its cousins, the LM3876/LM2876). With the kind of power supply you normally have available (single 45-55VDC) you only get 20-30W output, but as a dedicated tweeter amp this goes a surprisingly long way (and even further if you use an active filter in front of it). I have to admit that this idea is not actually mine, but something I have seen a manufacturer of active PA-speakers do several years ago (exactly with the ICEpower200ASC module as the bass amp and PSU).

The board works as-is, but it’s got a bigger turn-on thump than I would like so I need to see if I can get that a bit lower somehow. Otherwise I seems workable as-is – and my first impressions of the sound quality are actually also very good. I don’t have any of the ICEpower-modules at the moment, but I’ve got some industrial switching PSUs that I want to try out as well to see if they work.

 

Project files: PA100 parallel gainclone

What is it?
Board files for my “PA100” parallel chip amp with the LM3886 first presented here.

I’ve used the app. note version of the circuit which is non-inverting and uses low-tolerance components to minimise offset between the two ICs. There is also the Jeff Rowland-derived inverting circuit that is normally employed as a PA150/BPA300 configuration with three ICs per board.

I’ve mosty stuck to the datasheet circuit, but in some areas I have drawn inspiration from Tom Christensens article on the LM3886 IC. I’ve used SMT-components where I believe it makes sense to get a tight layout, but mostly its nice and diy-friendly leaded parts 🙂

How big are the boards?
The board measures 3.9” x 2.4” (app. 99 x 61 mm).

What is the status of the boards?
The files are for board version 1.1. I’ve made the following changes compared to the v1.0 prototype.

  • Mute capacitor footprint enlarged.
  • Mute resistor moved to the center of the board to make space for the larger capacitor.
  • Footprint for the LM3886 changed as the holes were very too small.
  • Made a small space between the large reservoir capacitors so they don’t touch each other.

Note that I haven’t tested the v1.1 (yet – will include them with my next PCB order) but I don’t expect any adverse effects of these changes.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Not really, but the recommended resistors are lower tolerance than what is common (the 0805 resistors are 0.1% and the 0R1/3W output resistors are 1%). Mouser has them all and there should be plenty of other sources. The amp will work with standard tolerances (1% for the SMTs, 5% for the outputs) but if you’re unlucky with the tolerances then performance will suffer a bit (higher DC-offset on the output and higher idle dissipation in the ICs). The recommended parts are not much more expensive so I definitely recommend you stick to them.

Anything else I need to know?

  • The gain setting resistors (the SMD-ones) should be 0.1% tolerance for best performance (see above).
  • Similarly, the load-sharing resistors on the output should be 1% tolerance for best performance (see above).
  • The power LED on the board is only between the negative supply and ground, so it is not a 100% indication that everything is OK.
  • The board obviously works with both versions of the LM3886, but I recommend the isolated (TF) version because it’s easier to mount.
  • Decoupling: My decoupling scheme is somewhere between the datasheet recommendation and TomChrs decoupling scheme. The topside parts are intended to be 100nF MKT or X7R MLCCs which is more or less what the data sheet specifies, but on the bottom there are pads for 1206/1210 SMD caps which you can fill with 4u7-10uF X7R MLCCs. You can also use the SMD pads for 100nF MLCCs and then mount electrolytic on top, but there isn’t much space so be a bit careful.
  • The board should be fed from a DC power supply, linear or switching. The large reservoir caps can be as big as you like, but as my prototype boards are intended to be powered by an SMPS (which is sensitive to capacitive loading) I’ve used fairly small capacitors. If you use a linear supply by all means use bigger capacitors.
  • Bridging: You can bridge two boards to create a BPA200 amplifier, but remember a) to lower the supply voltage to around +/-28VDC and b) that you need either a fully-balanced source/preamp or you need to invert the phase using a balanced line driver such as a DRV134/THAT1646 or or fully-differential amplifier of some sort.
  • Mechanics: The C-to-C spacing between the ICs is 1.5” (38 mm).

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

You can find additional information about the LM3886 amplifiers in the data sheet, the AN-1192 appnote linked above and several other resources – check them all out 🙂

A parallel amplifier with the LM3886…

Gainclones or chipamps are a popular DIY-topic and I’ve done a couple of designs myself and assembled a few others as well. The only one of the “original” National semi amplifier IC’s that I haven’t really done anything with – and coincidentally the only one that’s still in production – is the LM3886.

But not any more, because I just finished a simple design with two LM3886s in parallel configuration. The circuit is built (mostly) according to the “PA100” design from the original National application note (AN-1192) and not the Jeff Rowland-derived PA150/BPA300 that has different configuration and of course a third IC per board.

The configuration with two parallel ICs gives full current output at +/-35V into 4 ohms where a single IC would otherwise be thermally limited, but of course the power is still modest. As I recently swapped my faithful Sonus Faber speakers for a set of Scansonic MB towers which have a fairly low impedance, that’s exactly what I needed though (not to mention that I had a 35V supply left over from another project 🙂 ). The two-chip configuration also means boards can be kept small (and cheap), and there’s still the option of using two boards per channel in bridge-mode to make a BPA200, although the supply voltage would have to be reduced – only the BPA300 will run at 35V rails in BTL-mode as well.

The boards worked first time on power-up and seem to be well-behaved (quick tests only though). I need to do a bit more testing and make some minor (mechanical) changes to the layout and then I’ll publish the project files 😀

A Smaller Gainclone…

I have already done a couple of “gainclone”-type chipamp designs with the LM3875 amplifier IC, mainly here and here. Now there is a new one, this time based on the smaller LM1875 IC.

The smaller IC obviously means less voltage and less power compared to the LM3875 and LM3886 but unless you have a big room and/or very inefficient speakers (or you are having a party… 😀 ), the 20W or so that you can squeeze out of the LM1875 should still go quite far.

The circuit I’ve used is exactly the same as the standard one in the datasheet and also the same as the one used by chipamp.com in their kit. Some people might recognise the schematic as more or less a textbook example of how to make a non-inverting amplifier from an op-amp. That isn’t surprising though, because that is what the LM1875 really is – a power op-amp.

I have made the amplifier PCB as small as I could to make it possible to fit the amplifier either in a 1U enclosure or directly to a 50mm heatsink. The form factor of the board is a bit different than I originally intended, but layout-wise it’s obviously much better now than I could have managed by sticking to the original plan so that’s no big issue. In addition to the amplifier board I made a matching PSU board. This is a simple unregulated supply which is fine for this kind of application, but actually the current requirements of the LM1875 are approaching the range where regulation starts to be possible, so maybe I’ll do that some other time (in the future…).

The boards shown here are the prototypes with the mostly standard components I had available (and yes, the heat sink is for testing purposes as well). In the works is a more “boutique” version with better parts which is probably also the one I’ll end up putting in an enclosure. Testing confirms that it does indeed play music, but real listening tests I’ll hold off until I have the other prototype ready.