ACP+ clone progress…

Just a quick update because my ACP+ clone is now (very nearly) done. It took a bit longer than I had expected because of some delays getting boards and parts, and I do actually still miss one part that will hopefully turn up next week – fingers crossed.

As I did with the “Whammy” headamp I’ve taken the original “all-in-one” board layout of the ACP+ and turned it into a mono amplifier board and a separate PSU (and offboard volume control). Other changes include:

  • New heat sink profile (Fischer SK104 or equivalent).
  • Various footprint-changes for parts on the amplifier board.
  • Larger footprint for the initial filtering resistors in the PSU so it’s possible to use inductors instead.
  • Output switching (pre/headphone) directly on the board with a tiny Omron relay (these are the parts that I am still missing).

Until I get the relays I can’t do the last bit of testing but so far the PSU works and both amplifier channels bias correctly and play clean audio and that is always a good starting point 🙂

More information (and hopefully better pictures…) to follow when everything is done.

Reworking the ACP+…

Last weekend was this year’s “Burning Amp” festival in San Francisco. I wasn’t there (it’s a bit far from Denmark for a weekend trip…), but as usual there was a thread on diyaudio.

Burning Amp has frquently been a “launchpad” for new Nelson Pass designs and this year was no exception – the Amp Camp Pre (ACP+) was shown and the article is now on the FirstWatt website. As usual when Nelson releases a new design you sit up and take notice, but this one was just what I wanted to see (because there is only so many 25W class A amps you can use 😉 ). The ACP+ is a discrete preamp/headphone amp with the same basic architecture as a Pass J2 power amplifier. It’s discrete, doesn’t use a lot of components and runs from a single supply. The only fly in the proverbial ointment is that the amp uses P-channel JFETs for the input (either 2SJ74 or LSJ74), which are either impossible to get (2SJ) or just plain expensive (LSJ). However, I’m certainly not going to let that minor inconvenience stop me.

Nelson has of course done a board for the ACP+ already which will eventually find its way to the diyaudio store I’m sure. However, the original board breaks one of my rules because it has connectors on two edges. It also doesn’t look like the onboard RCAs are particularly good quality. As usual (I am tempted to say) I prefer a more modular approach, with the power supply, the amplifier, the volume pot etc. separated and so as I’ve done in the past I am going to have a go at redoing the ACP+ in modules instead. When I dig into the design I am sure i will be tempted to add a few changes, but let’s see. I expect I am going to build the original proposed linear supply, but an obvious candidate (in my mind) is a filtered IRM-module.

PCB order (hopefully) going out shortly, so with the usual shipping lead time this is going to be my X-mas present for myself this year 🙂

Picture of the prototype amp from the diyaudio-thread.

The last F5?

I’ve built a couple variations of the F5 already and I have a couple more that haven’t been finished yet, but the last one of them is here. It’s a pair of mono blocks with fan cooling and a large power supply 🙂

This project was of course driven by the fact that I really liked my original F5 build, but also by the fact that I had some suitable heatsinks and that I got a good offer on a couple of transformers that were really meant for a Pass/FirstWatt mono block build (2x18V/250VA each). The heatsinks actually turned out to be a mixed blessing, because they are just a millimeter or two too tall for most of the readily available enclosures, so I had to go up to a 3U size. I also decided to choose a slightly larger footprint instead of trying to shoehorn everything into a “real” half-width box. That annoyed me in the beginning, but to be honest I am not regretting that now.

Design-wise, you should be able to see the inspiration of some of my other projects in this one and that is no coincidence – there were some concepts I wanted to “recycle”. That last piece to arrive of what you see now was the rear panels which showed up a few days ago. Fitting them was a quick job, but they are quite expensive and so I can’t help but breathe a sigh of relief when they fit as I intended the first time. No matter how many checks and paper mock-ups I have done in the creation process it’s always a huge relief when everything works…

Still a bit of a way to go, but getting this far was very satisfying 🙂

The BoSoZ…

When I started to look around for balanced preamp designs some time ago, the BBA3FE wasn’t the only design that turned up. Another candidate was a sort of “predecessor” for it, namely the Pass Balanced Zen Line Stage (aka BoSoZ). I was a little slower getting started on this one so the BBA3FE came first, but a few weeks later inspiration struck and I managed to finish the layouts for both the BoSoZ and the matching PSU as well.

I chose a mono configuration for the amp board to maximize flexibility and minimize board cost. I’ve only made some minor changes to the schematic, but you should be able to see the resemblance to the BBA3FE layout easily. My prototype version uses 27.5mm output caps because I had some I wanted to use, but the “real” version of the board has space for 37.5mm caps as well and is only slightly larger (app. 5mm deeper).

As you can see I’ve actually also made good headway on the mechanicals of the design so what you can see now is really a semi-completed amplifier. Other than the new amp/psu boards I’ve picked components “off-the-shelf”, i.e. input selectors, an output relay board and an aux PSU that I have previously done, so putting it all together wasn’t that hard to do.

I need to pull myself together a little and get the wiring done before it will play music for real, but other than that it’s looking very promising – and the initial sound quality tests definitely match that as well 🙂

Project files: PassHP headphone amp

What is it?
It’s the project files for the PassHP headphone amplifier from last week’s post and judging by the number of views since then they are eagerly awaited 😀
As mentioned last time, this design is a clone of the one from here and my version consists of a mono amplifier board and a stereo PSU board instead of the original “all-in-one” design.

How big are the boards?
The amplifier boards measure 2.95” x 3.0” (app. 75 x 76 mm.) and the PSU board measures 2.0” x 5.05” (app. 51 x 128 mm.).

What is the status of the boards?
Both boards are in version 1.0 as the prototype seems to work well and I couldn’t be bothered to make any cosmetic changes 😉

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Well, the recommended 2SJ313/2SK2013 output transistors are a bit hard to find, but there are plenty of substitutes available. This is a fairly simple design, so otherwise no problems.

Anything else I need to know?

  • Resistors: I’ve used RN60-type resistors which are rated 0.5W, but that probably isn’t necessary – at least not for all the positions.
  • Heatsinks: The heat sink profile is the one Fischer calls SK104 but there are many substitutes. The power dissipation isn’t great so even the small 25mm high version should suffice, but if you want to use bigger ones for cosmetic reasons that should be just fine 🙂
  • Transistors: I’ve used 2SJ313/2SK2013 output devices because I had them, but if you don’t then I recommend using IRF610/9610 or one of the other substitutes mentioned in the diyaudio build thread. The 2SJ/2SK pairs are now either very expensive or very fake (and sometimes even both!), so using parts that are still in production should be safer.
  • Optocoupler: In theory this is also substitutable for something else, but in all honesty I don’t know exactly how the optical bias-system works so it’s probably best to stick with the standard 4N35.
  • Gain: The default gain is app. 6 but that can be lowered or raised by tweaking the value of R4. In theory you should recalculate the BW-limiting capacitor across the resistor if you change the value, but in practice you’ll probably be fine unless you make major changes. My prototype version has a gain of 3 (R4 = 2k) and I haven’t observed any problems.
  • Opamp: My version uses a single-channel opamp which gives a bit more choice. Start out with something like the OPA604, OPA134 or LME49710 and then experiment from there if you want to change the sound.
    Most opamps have a max. supply voltage of +/-15V so as a starting point I’d recommend this as the supply voltage. If you want more voltage swing use the OPA604 which is good up to +/-22V.
  • PSU voltage adjustment: Just as in the original you can use LEDs to raise the output voltage of the supply above the regulator voltage (although I’ve ditched the resistor option). Using 7×15-regulators and green/red LEDs should give you around 17V output whereas using 7×18-regulators and LEDs should bump that to app. 20V. If you just want the regulator voltage as the output, remember to jumper across the LED pins and omit the capacitor.

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
You really should chew your way through the diyaudio-thread for information about the amplifier. As mentioned this version was mostly because I did not like the original form factor. If you just want a functioning amplifier then I strongly recommend that you buy one of the “real” boards from Wayne Colburn via DIYaudio (or wait a few weeks for when the boards show up in the diyaudio store).

Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

New PassDIY headphone amp…

One of the (few) PCB-projects that I have been able to spend time lately on is a version of a new PassDIY headphone amp developed by Wayne Colburn. I’ve been looking at this from when it was first posted (after all, most diy’ers watch with interest when Nelson and his gang are up to something new 🙂 ) When the design was finally released a few months ago and Wayne started offering boards I didn’t jump on it immediately though.

First off all there was a question of cost – paying $35 in shipping for $25 worth of PCB is a bit annoying although I probably would have survived that. Secondly, the “all-in-one” form factor has some very obvious benefits, but also some significant drawbacks to me. You’re generally tied to one particular chassis, one particular transformer, one specific potentiometer etc. and I wanted more flexibility.

So instead of getting a ready-made board I started thinking about making a more flexible version by splitting the board up into smaller sections – two mono amplifier channels and a separate supply board to which you need to add a separate volume control and a separate transformer. The design is simple and so there were no major issues and my protoype fortunately worked the first time.

As usual I have only done quick bench testing right now, but the design seems to be solid (no doubt more to the designer’s credit than mine 😀 ). There is no DC-offset worth mentioning although it spikes a little when you turn the power off, and even in a “birds nest” test setup with wires all over the place, the amp was completely silent. As far as I can see, the bias is spot on and stable as well.

Project files coming in a few weeks when I’ve had time to compile them 🙂 In the mean time, you can still get the original boards through the thread and the original Gerbers are there as well if you want to get your own boards made instead.

First Watt F4 (part 1)

I don’t normally build class A amps in the summer because my apartment gets really warm, but this time is an exception. Partly because this summer in Copenhagen has been much more “class A amp friendly” (i.e. a lot colder!) than usual, and partly because this is a design I’ve been wanting to try for a very long time now.

The First Watt F4 is a classic Nelson Pass/First Watt design with JFET inputs and MOS-FET outputs. However, as with the other FW amps there is a twist here, namely that the F4 has no voltage gain. That means it’s essentially a buffer than can provide a full 25W class A output. What’s the point of that you might ask? Well, one point is that it can help get a better gain structure and that it’s possible to use some sources (such as DACs) which have a very high output. There are various other applications in the F4 manual as well.

Some will have spotted that the F4 boards are from the diyaudio store. They are good quality and a well-proven design, so I decided not to bother doing my own.

The chassis is sort of the usual from Modushop, but then not quite anyway. Partly because the heatsinks are predrilled 4U types from diyaudio (which did cost a bit more, but saved me drilling and tapping nearly 30 M3 holes) – because they match the boards 100%, and partly because I have decided to do a bit of “hacking” to make a non-standard size chassis (teaser! 🙂 )

So, in addition to the chassis hacking, I am also thinking about which preamp to choose to provide the voltage gain for this and obviously there are plenty to choose from, so it should be possible to come up with an intriguing combination for you guys 😀

Soundwise I also have quite high expectations because of my past experience with the First Watt F5 design – which I still consider one of the best sounding amplifiers I have tried in my home system – but let’s see if the F4 delivers on that front as well when it’s ready 🙂

(Yet another) anniversary!

Yes, it’s that time of the year again – and this year it’s the fourth anniversary of the blog 😀

Not a lot to say that I haven’t already said the last couple of years, but I still expect to continue writing as much as time allows. I am also still very excited and greatly appreciative of your questions and comments, so keep it up 🙂

Picture below is of what is (currently) sitting near the top of my project pipeline, namely four 4U diyaudio special-edition pre-drilled heatsinks. These are specifically intended to accelerate (as much as possible) the completion of my Pass VFET project as well as one other Pass project using boards from the diyaudio store that I have wanted to do for some time now 🙂

Project files: VFET PSU

What is it?
In response to a reader request, the project files for my V-FET PSU board shown here. Of course, this will also work for any other class A design you might think of, as it is a fairly standard CC-R-C configuration with onboard rectifiers and space for three 35mm snap-in capacitors per rail. On typical class A voltages that means you’ll be able to use capacitors in the 22-33mF range and the the onboard rectifiers are 15-25A plastic SIP types, which should be just fine for most applications.

Input and output connections are via FAST-ON tabs and there are two sets of output connections. Since we’re paying for the copper on the boards anyway, I’ve tried to keep as much of it as possible  with a top-side ground plane and the supply rails on the bottom. 🙂

How big are the boards?
The board measures 3.1” x 6.675” (app. 78 x 170 mm).

What is the status of the boards?
Since the prototypes worked fine I haven’t made any changes and the board is therefore version 1.0.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Nothing worth worrying about really. The only possible exception is only really the rectifier which is in a small GBU-package. However, Mouser has them up to 25A (p/n 750-GBU2510-G) and they are available from many other sources in 10-15A variants as well.

Anything else I need to know?

  • If you want to use off-board bridges, bridge the AC and the DC-connections with as thick a wire as you can get through the holes. That should allow you to use offboard metal-cased rectifiers up to 50A. Since the average current draw of most class A amps is quite low and the surge ratings aren’t that different between package types I don’t see the need to use anything else than the plastic ones, but by all means complicate matters with offboard bridges if you must 😀
  • The four series resistors can be 3-5W types in parallel which should be plenty, even if you want to burn off a bit of voltage in them.
  • The (optional) 3W bleeder resistor discharges the two first capacitors while the LEDs will discharge the last ones. The series resistor for the LED can be a 1/2W or 1W type.
  • Last, but not least: Electrolytic capacitors in this sort of size aren’t to be trifled with, so make sure you mount them correctly and test the board properly before mounting it in your amplifier chassis.

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

vfetpsupcb-2

VFET progress…

Well, not that much progress on the Pass VFET boards themselves – hopefully this weekend something will happen – but I have managed to make a PSU-board for them. Plenty of those around already of course, but being a) particular about dimensions and b) a bit particular about PCB colour matching I decided to roll my own instead 🙂

The design is a pi-filtered CC-R-C type with space for 35mm electrolytics, which at the VFET-voltage are available up to 27-33mF. As I plan to use the boards in mono-mode (one per channel) that’s actually enough energy storage to be a bit frightening. The Pi-resistors can dissipate up to 12W per channel which should be plenty (at least I don’t plan to go that high).

Also included are a polyester decoupling cap, a bleeder resistor for the two first electrolytics and a pair of LEDs which, apart from indicating power, also bleeds the last pair of caps.

As the pictures show, I’m still missing some parts but this project was never going to be a rush-job anyway so that’s just fine. The days in Scandinavia are getting noticeably shorter now, so saving projects for winter will not be a problem 🙂