Project files: A smaller mains controller…

What is it?
As mentioned a few weeks ago I’ve recently built another control board for switching a mains transformer with a low-voltage (latching) switch. This in a slightly different form factor so that if your application requires it, the board can be stacked with a matching standby-PSU and mains splitter and/or my passive softstart board. It is possible (just) to stack all three boards on top of each other in a 2U/80mm high enclosure or just two boards in a 50mm tall enclosure.

You can decide which standby voltage should be used by choosing the right relay in resistor values and in addition to using a latching switch for engaging the relay, you can also use a DC-voltage between app. 3-30V as the trigger. This input is isolated via an optocoupler and the trigger circuit only requires app. 15mA from the triggering device.

The matching standby PSU board uses the (by now) well-known IRM AC-DC power modules from Mean Well. There are two versions, one for the 3W module which is 100% outline-compatible with the control board and a version for the 5-10W modules where some of the connectors had to be shifted but the mounting holes still fit. The PSU board also provides a splitter-function to give two mains outputs.

How big are the boards?
All the boards are 2” x 2” (app. 51 x 51 mm) – the original theslowdiyer industry standard ™ 😀

What is the status of the boards?
These boards are v1.0 and they all work as expected.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
No.

Anything else I need to know?

  • The switch must be a latching type (meaning it stays in either on or off positions) and to turn the relay on you connect the switch so that the + voltage is connected to the switch pin. This turns on a transistor which switches the relay on.
  • The relay is rated for 5A inductive loads, so should be good for transformers up to around 1000VA at 230VAC (to give a bit of safety margin).
  • The optocoupler on the trigger input is fed from a constant-current source (CCS) made from an LM317L voltage regulator. If I was designing a commercial product this would probably be a sacking offence because it’s much more expensive than the alternatives, but for our purposes it works quite well 🙂
  • There are two LEDs on the control board, one to indicate the board is powered and one to indicate the relay is on.
  • The “ext” output is intended for us if you want to feed the unswitched standby voltage to some other circuit. There’s space for a bigger resistor here if you need to drop voltage for e.g. LEDs, but you can also jumper the resistor to just get the raw voltage (or leave the output if you don’t need it).
  • The mains connectors on the standby-PSU are marked as inputs and outputs, but in reality it doesn’t matter what you use as inputs and outputs.

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

Remember that these boards use mains voltage. Be careful when mounting and handling them!

Project files: INA217 Microphone Preamp

What is it?
Board files for my INA217-based microphone preamp and the matching PSU as shown here. The design is meant to be “configurable” with three different gain options and phantom power selectable via jumpers. The amp also has a full complement of protection features. The matching PSU has three rails via two small onboard transformers for a compact “all-in-one” solution.

How big are the boards?
The amp board measures 3.1” x 1.9” (app. 79 x 48 mm.) and the PSU board measures 3.95” x 2.7” (app. 100 x 69 mm).

What is the status of the boards?
The amp board is version 2.1. Version 2.0 was my update of the original design as showcased in the previous blog post (link) and 2.1 adds a few minor tweaks including an LED to indicate directly on the amp board if phantom power is on or off.
The PSU board is version 2.1 as well for much the same reasons (although the v2.1 “tweaks” consisted mostly of fixing a couple of fairly serious mistakes in component labelling 😀 )

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Not really hard-to-find as such, but still worthy of some attention 🙂

  • The regulator for the phantom supply regulator must be a LM317HV type which allows for a greater in/out differential. You can use the standard version as well, but a short will then kill the regulator.
  • As for the INA217: I am not sure if there are fakes about, but buy from reputable sources just in case. Anything in an 8-pin DIP is an easy target for fakes really.

Anything else I need to know?

  • This board adds nearly all the bells and whistles described in this paper from THAT corp on instrumentation amp IC-based microphone preamps. These extra components for short-circuit and EMI-protection are optional, but definitely recommended.
  • The board has a Neutrik A-series Combo-jack onboard which is very practical and versatile. Unfortunately it means that if you use the TRS it shorts the phantom voltage to ground if it is plugged/unplugged while the amp is on. Protection features have been added, but this scenario is best avoided so only (dis)connect the TRS while the amp is off.
  • See the INA217 datasheet for gain calculations. While you can add a switch to select between the different gain settings, doing so may add quite a lot of noise so it’s not recommended.
  • Voltages for transformers: The two transformers will have to be 2×12-15V and 2x18V respectively. They are usually single-primary, so choose the ones that you need. Note that with transformers in this form factor you will not be able to deliver more power than is required for a single mic amp. If you need a triple PSU that can supply more than one amp board, this design should work just fine (with external transformers.
  • Replacements for the INA217 are mainly the THAT1510/1512, but there are some differences so I am honestly not sure if they are a drop-in replacement. Refer to the files under “related information” if you want to check for yourself.

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

Before you start I strongly suggest you read through the INA217 datasheet. Please also refer to the aforementioned paper from THAT on this type of microphone preamps, this THAT design note and the datasheet for the THAT1510/THAT1512 ICs.

Project files: STEPS clone PSU

What is it?
The board for my “STEPS-clone” single-rail linear PSU as described here. This PSU is suitable for low-power streamers, DACs, headphone amps etc. that run on a single DC-voltage rail and require less than app. 15W maximum. This isn’t really a 100% clone of the original STEPS supply (see here), but I’ve drawn quite a bit of inspiration from the STEPS so I think the credit is well-deserved anyway 🙂

Note that the transformer primary connections are hardwired on the board, so there are separate 115V and a 230V versions of the board files.

How big are the boards?
The board measures 3.95” x 4.7” (app. 100 x 119 mm)

What is the status of the boards?
The published board files are for version 1.0 which is the version I have prototyped. There are a few minor changes I could do, but it’s mostly cosmetic and it might be a while before I get to it anyway so I have decided to publish this version.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
If you can order from Mouser, then nothing here is hard-to find. If you can’t, then the only thing that might be difficult to substitute is the Murata common-mode choke and that is optional anyway 🙂

Anything else I need to know?

  • The original idea was that the board should be able to slide into a eurocard-sized enclosure (that’s also the reason for the two extra mounting holes). However, in practice this isn’t possible as the primary pins of the transformer are way too close to the enclosure walls to make this safe. My recommended enclosure is the GX1xx-types from modushop, but there are many other options. If you have more devices, you can of course use larger enclosures to hold multiple PSUs.
  • The transformer secondaries are in parallel, so with the standard Talema range from 7VAC to 22VAC, it should be possible to make the STEPS with outputs from around 3-25VDC.
  • The 2-pin header near the output can be used to connect a volt meter to display the output voltage (or it can be used for something else – your choice! :D).
  • The solder pads on the board can be used either as test points or to tap the AC or unregulated DC-voltage from the board to another PSU board for an AUX-voltage of some sort (additional circuit, trigger voltage etc.). Remember to watch the total load on the transformer and the maximum heat dissipation in all regulators.
  • You can use my spreadsheet here to calculate the adjustment resistors for various output voltages. This will show you the upper/lower limit voltages if you use a trimpot for variable output, and also the power dissipation in the adjustment resistors which you need to be careful with at higher outputs.
  • The only really tricky bit of this circuit is (potentially) managing heat dissipation if your load draws a lot of power on a continuous basis. You’ll have to balance the heat dissipation in the regulator and the pi-filter resistors, while still keeping the voltage to the regulator high enough so that it doesn’t drop out – even if the mains voltage varies a bit. A little tip can be that if your load device isn’t sensitive to output voltage, then turning up the output by app. 0.5-1V will shift some heat away from the regulator. Be sure that you stay within the specs of whatever you are connecting to the PSU at all times of course!
  • As usual for these circuits, you can use both standard and LDO (low-drop regulators). The low-drop types are normally not “better”, but can be a bit less tolerant of circuitry and load conditions so it’s actually better to stick with standard LM317 unless you have a good reason to use an LDO.
  • The only time it really makes sense to use a 3A rated regulator (LM350 or Lx1085 types) would be if your PSU is 5-7V output with a 25VA transformer. If your output voltage is higher or the transformer is smaller, the 1.5A+ current limit of a standard LM317 (or Lx1086) should be just fine.

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
1) Read the original STEPS page linked above. Even if the circuit isn’t completely the same, there is still lots of great info about the LM317 type regulators and how to get the most of them.
2) Read the manufacturers datasheet for the regulator that you are working with. Pay specific attention to recommendations around output capacitance and bypassing of the adjust pin as there are some differences between regulator models and manufacturers here.

Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

 

Project files: IRM Switching PSUs

What is it?
Since I first discovered the IRM-series of compact switching supplies from Mean Well I’ve grown quite fond of them. They are compact, cheap and very easy to implement so they are perfect for everywhere an “aux-voltage” is required to power non-critical circuitry. Through the different applications I’ve found for these I have managed to build up a full series of boards suitable for the IRMs.

While some of the boards can be (and are intended to be) used for “serious” stuff (to be shown later on), a very obvious application for most of these boards are as AUX-supplies for powering relays, displays, logic circuitry etc. where a bit more or a bit less ripple and noise are of no consequence, but where the compact size and low standby consumption is a real plus.

There are four board versions, suitable for the IRM modules in all versions from 3-30W output power (the 30W board is missing from the pictures as I couldn’t find the prototype when they were taken – sorry! 😀 ).

How big are the boards?

  • The 3W board measures 1.8” x 1.5” (app. 46 x 38 mm.)
  • The 5/10W board measures 1.2” x 2.65” (app. 31 x 67 mm.)
  • The 15/20W board measures 1.25” x 2.95” (app. 32 x 75 mm.)
  • The 30W board measures 1.6” x 3.6” (app. 41 x 92 mm.)

What is the status of the boards?
All of the board files are version 1.0 or higher. Some tweaks have been done after the initial protoypes for a few of them, mostly because of errors/issues with the IRM module footprints.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
No, none. Several places to get the IRM-modules them selves (Mouser, Reichelt, TME etc.) and everything else on the boards is more or less optional 😀

Anything else I need to know?

  • The modules have worse specs for ripple and noise than most linear regulators, but obviously the switching frequency is quite high (66-100 kHz depending on model), which means that passive filtering like an LC or a CRC (“pi”) filter would be an ideal way of reducing the output noise. I have a couple of examples for that which I might show later.
  • I haven’t been able to find a spec for how much capacitance the modules will tolerate on the output, but it probably should not be overdone.
  • Remember that obviously one side of the board carries mains voltage, so take the necessary precautions when working with them.

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

Project files: VFET PSU

What is it?
In response to a reader request, the project files for my V-FET PSU board shown here. Of course, this will also work for any other class A design you might think of, as it is a fairly standard CC-R-C configuration with onboard rectifiers and space for three 35mm snap-in capacitors per rail. On typical class A voltages that means you’ll be able to use capacitors in the 22-33mF range and the the onboard rectifiers are 15-25A plastic SIP types, which should be just fine for most applications.

Input and output connections are via FAST-ON tabs and there are two sets of output connections. Since we’re paying for the copper on the boards anyway, I’ve tried to keep as much of it as possible  with a top-side ground plane and the supply rails on the bottom. 🙂

How big are the boards?
The board measures 3.1” x 6.675” (app. 78 x 170 mm).

What is the status of the boards?
Since the prototypes worked fine I haven’t made any changes and the board is therefore version 1.0.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Nothing worth worrying about really. The only possible exception is only really the rectifier which is in a small GBU-package. However, Mouser has them up to 25A (p/n 750-GBU2510-G) and they are available from many other sources in 10-15A variants as well.

Anything else I need to know?

  • If you want to use off-board bridges, bridge the AC and the DC-connections with as thick a wire as you can get through the holes. That should allow you to use offboard metal-cased rectifiers up to 50A. Since the average current draw of most class A amps is quite low and the surge ratings aren’t that different between package types I don’t see the need to use anything else than the plastic ones, but by all means complicate matters with offboard bridges if you must 😀
  • The four series resistors can be 3-5W types in parallel which should be plenty, even if you want to burn off a bit of voltage in them.
  • The (optional) 3W bleeder resistor discharges the two first capacitors while the LEDs will discharge the last ones. The series resistor for the LED can be a 1/2W or 1W type.
  • Last, but not least: Electrolytic capacitors in this sort of size aren’t to be trifled with, so make sure you mount them correctly and test the board properly before mounting it in your amplifier chassis.

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

vfetpsupcb-2

Project files: Amplifier PSUs

Digging in the back catalogue a bit again here.…and found some of my power supply boards that I haven’t published yet 🙂

What is it?
Power supplies for amplifiers, d’oh! 😀 Two basic variants, namely a “class AB” type and a “class A” type. The “class A” type is intended to be used in a CxC configuration with resistors onboard for CRC and pads for a choke to make it CLC. The “class AB” one is a standard unregulated design for class AB or D amplifiers that allows using both small 16/18mm radial capacitors and large snap-in types (up to 35mm). Here there are two versions, one for 2 off 35mm caps (or 8 smaller caps) per rail and one for 3/12.

The picture below is of the large class AB board. It’s actually the board from the previous post that has had some caps mounted in the mean time 🙂

How big are the boards?
The AB board measures 3.55” x 3.9” (app. 90 x 99 mm.) for the standard version and 3.05” x 6.1” (app. 77 x 155 mm.) for the XL version. The CRC board measures 3.15” x 3.95” (app. 80 x 100 mm).

What is the status of the boards?
Both of the “class AB” boards are in v1.0. The “class A” board is in v1.1 as I made a couple of tweaks (including the pads for off board R/L) to my original version. The original v1.0 is the board that I use in my “Green Monstre” amps.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Nothing, really. You can go overboard with expensive capacitors if you want, but even if you have the money to put NOS Black Gates in your power supplies I’d still suggest you spend them elsewhere in the circuit 😀

Anything else I need to know?

  • Unless you are building very small amplifiers I’d recommend that the CRC and the small AB boards are used in dual-mono configurations with one PSU per amplifier channel. The large AB board can be shared across channels for a medium power class AB or D amplifier (meaning anything with a rail voltage up to around 55V and 63V caps).
  • The boards all include LEDs that indicate power and bleed the capacitors when no load is connected (albeit very slowly). The corresponding resistor footprints should be large enough to allow fairly high LED currents but remember to calculate the power dissipation.
  • The CRC board has space for two resistors in parallel per rail, either axial types (up to around 3-5W will fit) or MPC7x radial types up to 5W.
  • The rectifiers are GBU-types which are available from Mouser up to a 25A rating.
  • Input connections for the Class AB “XL” board are via FAST-ON tabs. All other input/output connections are via 5mm spacing screw terminals.
  • The capacitors on the class A-board can be up to 30mm in diameter. Since class A amps tend to get hot, I’d recommend 105 degree types here. As mentioned above, the class AB boards use either snap-in caps up to 35mm diameter or 16/18mm  radial caps with 7.5mm pin spacing.
  • Needless to say, all capacitors should be rated appropriately for your amplifier’s rail voltage.

     

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
These are very simple circuits, but there’s some god background on PSU design for amplifiers over on Rod Elliot’s pages (under “power”)

Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

Project files: LM1875 Gainclone

What is it?
The project files for my mini gain clone with the LM1875 IC as described here. The download file includes both the amplifier board and the matching PSU-board.

How big are the boards?
The amplifier boards measures 1.8” x 1.3” (app. 33 x 46 mm.)  and the PSU board measures 3.9” x 1.8” (app. 99 x 46 mm.)

What is the status of the boards?
Both boards are v1.0. I have built a working prototype, but detailed testing is on hold until I have build another set that I want to turn into a finished amplifier. All I know is that the design plays music just fine on the test bench 🙂

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Not really, unless you choose to go overboard with expensive boutique parts, such as premium capacitors and fast rectifiers. You can, but you don’t have to… 😀

Anything else I need to know?

  • The boards are intended to be used in dual-mono configuration with one supply board per amplifier. Take the speaker output from the amplifier board and the speaker ground connection from the spare ground terminal on the PSU output connector. It is of course also possible for two amps to share a PSU, but you may struggle with wiring everything with reasonably thick cables.
  • If you want to mount the amplifier in a 1U/40mm heatsink you need to keep the capacitors on the PSU board below app. 30mm in height and the amplifier board mounted perpendicular to the heatsink. If you have more space it is possible to mount the boards directly to a 50mm heat sink (parallel to the heat sink with the IC mounted from the underside). This would however mean you have to bend the pins of the LM1875 to fit yourself, because there is no standard pin configuration that supports this way of mounting.
  • You can mount R4 either on the top or the bottom of the board. I’d recommend that you use the opposite side of where the amplifier IC is mounted for easiest access.
  • There are more versions of the LM1875 IC depending on how the leads are shaped (straight and two different bend patterns in both 90deg and 180deg versions). From the datasheet I honestly can’t determine the correct order code for this board, so you’re on your own here… 😉

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

Read the LM1875 datasheet for more information. I’d also recommended the chipamp.com kit manual as a good source of information.

 

Project files: ICEpower Linear PSU

What is it?
The project files for the linear ICEpower PSU board I showed here. The first version of this board concept was made around 10 years ago, but as I didn’t have any boards left over I updated the design and cleaned it up a bit in the process.
The basis of this is once again the GP-PSUs shown here and the same file that I also used in a triple-configuration here. I have simply added a single high-power rail with a rectifier, two main caps and the usual decoupling + discharge LED – absolutely nothing fancy 🙂

How big are the boards?
This is the “XL”-version for 35mm main caps and the board measures 4.4” x 3.45” (app. 112 x 88 mm.).

What is the status of the boards?
The design is called v2.0 as it is based on a previous idea. It’s been prototyped and I see no mechanical or electrical issues.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Not really, unless you choose to go overboard with expensive boutique parts, such as premium capacitors and fast rectifiers for the low-voltage supply (which I kinda did…).

Anything else I need to know?

  • The board should work with the ICEpower 200AC/300AC and the 250A modules which require around a 50VDC Vp voltage. For the 500A and 1000A modules you might need to check and modify the board files to get enough high-voltage clearance for the higher supply voltages used (nominal 80VDC/120VDC respectively)
  • The high-power supply uses a pair of snap-in capacitors up to 35mm in diameter and a GBU-type rectifier (available up to 25A). The low-voltage supply uses 22mm snap-in or 18/16mm standard radial caps with 1N540x or similar rectifiers.
  • Due to the rectifier setup on the low voltage supply, it is possible to use it with both single (voltage-doubled) and dual AC connections. In that case you should connect the transformer to one side of the AC-connector and you need only fit the required pair of diodes (either DA/DB or DX/DY), although of course there is no harm in mounting both pairs.
  • If you have space, I would recommend that you run “dual-mono” with separate power supplies for each channel, mainly to ensure that there is a good amount of capacitance on the high-power rail. If, like me, you still want one box and avoid a true mono-block design, then the high-power rail can use separate windings on the same transformer and the low-voltage transformers can be separate or shared between the channels. The sharing can of course be done either as parallel-connected dual rectifiers or as separate voltage-doubled circuits with each board using one transformer winding (honestly not sure what would be better here 🙂 ).

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

Read the ICEpower module datasheets carefully as well (and, if you can get your hands on them, the Designer’s Manuals as well).

Note: For once, I do actually have some spare boards left as I only needed the pair and I had to order 10 pcs. As you can see, they are green, HASL-plated and made with 2 oz. copper. If you are interested in boards, drop me a line.

Project files: GP-PSUs v2

What is it?
Two boards for general-purpose LM317/LM337 power supplies with two rails, useable for many low-power applications (preamps, buffers, filters etc.). There are two versions, one where the +/- voltage is derived from a single AC-voltage via a voltage-doubler and one where it comes from a traditional dual-AC, two-bridge rectifier circuit.
These boards are effectively an update on the old GP-PSUs and they are based on the triple-PSUs I posted a while ago. In fact they are just the three-rail designs with the third rail removed 😀

How big are the boards?
Both board versions measure 3.925″ x 1.8″ (app. 100 x 46 mm.) and they are mechanically interchangeable.

What is the status of the boards?
Both boards are in v1.0. I haven’t actually prototyped these in this format yet, but since they are the same as the three-rail version (which I have tested) I don’t mind publishing them.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Nothing, really. As always with these circuits, you can use standard LM317/337 regulators or splash out on more expensive (low-dropout) types like the LT/LM/LD108x-series. My experiences with the latter parts aren’t the greatest though (instability), so unless your applications require the low-drop capability I’d just as well stick to standard 317/337-types from a reputable source. If your application requires a higher performance PSU than this, you are probably better off looking at entirely different circuits and regulators anyway.

Anything else I need to know?
Yes, pretty much a repeat of what was mentioned for the three-rail circuits:

  • The diameter of the main filter capacitors is 18mm, but the dual footprint means that anything between 10mm and 18mm should be fine.
  • The DIP rectifier bridges exist in versions up to 2A rated current although anything more than 1A can be a bit difficult to find. Realistically though, if you plan on drawing more than 1A from either supply the SK104-type heat sinks are probably going to be a limiting factor anyway.
  • Mounting the regulators and heat sinks is a bit of a faff because there is not much space, especially if the heat sinks are 38mm or taller. My suggestion (as always) is something like this:
    • 1) Loosely assemble the regulator, the isolation components and the heatsink.
    • 2) Mount the combination on the PCB and solder the heatsink in place.
    • 3) Tighten the screw holding the regulator to the heatsink.
    • 4) Solder the regulator in place.

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Even though the regulators used here are generic types made by many manufacturers, there can be small differences in recommended parts values etc. I suggest you always consult the regulator data sheets from the specific manufacturer.

Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.

Project files: Universal Triple-PSUs

What is it?
Two boards for general-purpose LM317/LM337 power supplies with three rails, useable for many low-power applications where both a +/- supply and an auxiliary voltage are needed. Examples include analog amplifier + digital/logic circuitry, microphone preamplifier + phantom voltage etc.
There are two versions, one where the +/- voltage is derived from a single AC-voltage via a doubler and one where it comes from a traditional two-bridge rectifier circuit. This design is virtually a copy of my GP-PSUs. I made some minor enhancements and added the extra rail, but it is the same basic design.

How big are the boards?
Both board versions measure 3.925″ x 2.6″ (app. 100 x 66 mm.) and they are mechanically interchangeable.

What is the status of the boards?
The “standard” board is in v1.0 and works fine. The voltage-doubled board is in v1.1 and also works fine. The two versions are completely identical except for the diode/bridge arrangement on the +/- supply. The difference in version numbers came because I originally prototyped a different (smaller) layout for the voltage-doubled version. After making the “standard” version that requires a bit more space for the rectifier bridges, I decided it was smarter if they were both the same size and then changed the layout of the voltage-doubled board to match.

Does it use any special/expensive/hard-to-find parts?
Nothing, really. As always with these circuits, you can use standard LM317/337 regulators or splash out on more expensive (low-dropout) types like the LT/LM/LD108x-series. My experiences with the latter parts aren’t the greatest though (instability), so unless your applications require the low-drop capability I’d just as well stick to standard 317/337-types from a reputable source. If your application requires higher performance than this, you are probably better off looking at entirely different circuits and regulators.

Anything else I need to know?

  • There is a jumper on the boards that links the ground on the AUX-voltage to the midpoint (0V) of the +/- supply. This is optional and probably not required for most applications but can be used for e.g. linking analog and digital ground in mixed-signal circuits.
  • The diameter of the main filter capacitors is 16mm on the AUX supply and 18mm on the main supply.
  • The DIP rectifier bridges exist in versions up to 2A rated current although anything more than 1A can be a bit difficult to find. Realistically though, if you plan on drawing more than 1A from either supply the SK104-type heat sinks are probably going to be a limiting factor anyway.
  • Mounting the regulators and heat sinks is a bit of a faff because there is not much space, especially if the heat sinks are 38mm or taller. My suggestion (as always) is something like this:
    1) Loosely assemble the regulator, the isolation components and the heatsink.
    2) Mount the combination on the PCB and solder the heatsink in place.
    3) Tighten the screw holding the regulator to the heatsink.
    4) Solder the regulator in place.

Downloads:
Download design files here

Related information:
Even though the regulators used here are generic types made by many manufacturers, there can be small differences in recommended parts values etc. I suggest you always consult the regulator data sheets from the specific manufacturer.

Note: Always read the “intro post” for additional important information about my designs.